[Ans] The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing which of the following body parts?


The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing which of the following body parts? –One of the most famous examples of ancient Greek sculpture, the Venus de Milo is immediately recognizable by its missing arms and popularly believed to represent Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, who was known to the Romans as Venus. It is a marble sculpture, slightly larger than life size at 6 feet 8 inches high. Venus de Milo is widely renowned for the mystery of her missing arms. It is currently on permanent display at the Louvre Museum in Paris. The statue is named after the Greek island of Milos, where it was discovered. The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing which of the following body parts?

[Ans] The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing which of the following body parts?

  1. Ears
  2. Legs
  3. Arms
  4. Feet
The correct answer is Arms.

The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing Arms. An incessant contention set forward is that the pieces are of a lesser quality than the Venus de Milo. From the get go they look that way. However, a nearby glance at the actual Venus discloses a similar surface harm as should be visible on the pieces. The examples of weathering on both the statue and the parts line up when they are united back as they would have been at the time they’d been joined.

Answer of The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing which of the following body parts?

To put it plainly, researchers at the Louver went to a difficult situation to develop tangled contentions about why they were totally correct and any other person was off-base. The easy truth is, the Venus de Milo showed the goddess getting her right hand across her middle on her left side raised knee in a demonstration of preventing the curtains from falling totally to the ground. Her left hand held out an apple at close to eye level. This is the reason the goddess seems like she is looking some place past visitors into void space now. Her left arm was upheld by one of the herms (a point of support bested by a head) that remained to the left side on the missing plinth. Not the most esthetically exquisite design by modern guidelines, however it was made in another time considering the tastes of the supporter.


The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing Arms body parts. Another point is that the statue was painted in a way that today would most intently look like Christian models in Catholic foundations. The statue had metal connections for things like a coronet (crown) and gems. In the event that we could see the Venus de Milo as it was when fresh out of the plastic new, we’d most likely be put-off by the pompous appearance. Yet, the significant thing is, that is the way things were made to look.

The statue known as the “Venus de Milo” is missing which of the following body parts?

Arms are missing in the statue known as the “Venus de Milo”. As a last suspected, the persistent inquiry of how the statue was doing its arms is a presumptive one. The “secret” of the missing arms began as a helpful non-reply after endeavors at reestablishing the arms were suspended. It then started to cause to notice the statue since France was having a social feeling of inadequacy in the mid nineteenth 100 years. The sort of metropolitan legend took on a unique kind of energy. Today it is interminably sustained by individuals, not least of the relative multitude of caretakers at the Louver. They ought to have some better sense and disgrace on them.

Arms body part is missing in the statue known as the “Venus de Milo”. Tragically I can’t track down the specific story and statement, yet a magazine article about visiting the Louver during the 1960s referenced that a custodian at the Louver who had a Freudian slip that reveals the entire secret thing. He said it was something fortunate the Venus de Milo didn’t have her arms or she’d be undeniably less of a fascination with tourists. He then looked blameworthy for saying it.

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